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First Lines Fridays

First Lines Friday: 9th June

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?  If you want to make your own post, feel free to use or edit the banner above, and follow the rules below:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first
  • Finally… reveal the book!

If you’re using Twitter, don’t forget to use #FirstLinesFridays!

She was waiting for him – or someone – though he had not phoned ahead.  ‘Where’s the boy?’ she called from her porch.


Read on to find out which book this extract is from…

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The One-in-a-Million Boy by Monica Wood

29758030

INFO | Goodreads

BUY | The Book Depository


Summary:

The story of your life never starts at the beginning. Don’t they teach you anything at school?

So says 104-year-old Ona to the 11-year-old boy who’s been sent to help her out every Saturday morning. As he refills the bird feeders and tidies the garden shed, Ona tells him about her long life, from first love to second chances. Soon she’s confessing secrets she has kept hidden for decades.

One Saturday, he doesn’t show up. Ona starts to think he’s not so special after all, but then his father Quinn arrives on her doorstep, determined to finish his son’s good deed. The boy’s mother is not so far behind. Ona is set to discover that even at her age the world can surprise you, and that sometimes sharing a loss is the only way to find yourself again.


 

Oooh, I know this book is going to break my heart.  It’s wonderfully written, with an engaging plot and lots of character development – I can’t wait to finish it!

Check out the First Lines Fridays archive for more posts like this!

Happy reading,

Emma

Follow me on: Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Facebook

June 9, 2017
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First Lines Friday: 5th May

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?  If you want to make your own post, feel free to use or edit the banner above, and follow the rules below:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first
  • Finally… reveal the book!

If you’re using Twitter, don’t forget to use #FirstLinesFridays!

Carl Sagan said that if you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe. When he says “from scratch,” he means from nothing. He means from a time before the world even existed.


Read on to find out which book this extract is from…

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The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

28763485

INFO | Goodreads

BUY | The Book Depository


Goodreads Summary:

Natasha: I’m a girl who believes in science and facts. Not fate. Not destiny. Or dreams that will never come true. I’m definitely not the kind of girl who meets a cute boy on a crowded New York City street and falls in love with him. Not when my family is twelve hours away from being deported to Jamaica. Falling in love with him won’t be my story.

Daniel: I’ve always been the good son, the good student, living up to my parents’ high expectations. Never the poet. Or the dreamer. But when I see her, I forget about all that. Something about Natasha makes me think that fate has something much more extraordinary in store—for both of us.

The Universe: Every moment in our lives has brought us to this single moment. A million futures lie before us. Which one will come true?


This is my current read at the moment, and I’m loving it!  Nicola Yoon has such a natural way with words, and the writing is effortless to read.  I’m also enjoying the dual-narrative aspect and the chapters providing backstory to more minor characters – in that sense it reminds me of the narrative style in The Book Thief.  It’s quirky; I like it.

Though for some reason I can’t wrap my head around the title.  I seem determined to accidentally call it “The Sun Is Not A Star” whenever anyone asks me what I am reading, which I’m quite sure ruins the entire message of the book…

Check out the First Lines Fridays archive for more posts like this!

Happy reading,

Emma

Follow me on: Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Facebook

April 28, 2017
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First Lines Friday: 24th March

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?  If you want to make your own post, feel free to use or edit the banner above, and follow the rules below:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first
  • Finally… reveal the book!

If you’re using Twitter, don’t forget to use #FirstLinesFridays!

You have to be quick,
none of this pretending to be browsing business
that some shoplifters go for.


Read on to find out which book this extract is from…

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We Come Apart by Sarah Crossan and Brian Conaghan

INFO | Goodreads

BUY | The Book Depository


Summary:

Nicu has emigrated from Romania and is struggling to find his place in his new home. Meanwhile, Jess’s home life is overshadowed by violence. When Nicu and Jess meet, what starts out as friendship grows into romance as the two bond over their painful pasts and hopeful futures. But will they be able to save each other, let alone themselves?


I actually didn’t really dig this book.  Why pick a book I don’t like for First Lines Friday?  Well, Sarah Crossan’s One was insanely good, and I’m sure fans of her work will still appreciate her latest novel.  For me though, the whole thing was just slightly underwhelming.  I can see it working well as a film, but in this style – the poetic. tumbling-down-the-page writing that I’ve come to know Sarah Crossan for – I just don’t think the story works.  Still, it has some excellent first lines!

Check out the First Lines Fridays archive for more posts like this!

Happy reading,

Emma

Follow me on: Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Facebook

March 24, 2017
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First Lines Friday: 3rd March

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?  If you want to make your own post, feel free to use or edit the banner above, and follow the rules below:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first
  • Finally… reveal the book!

If you’re using Twitter, don’t forget to use #FirstLinesFridays!

First of all, I’m sorry.  Second of all, you’re welcome.


Read on to find out which book this extract is from…

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The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo by Amy Schumer

INFO | Goodreads

BUY | The Book Depository


Summary:

In The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo, Amy mines her past for stories about her teenage years, her family, relationships, and sex and shares the experiences that have shaped who she is – a woman with the courage to bare her soul to stand up for what she believes in, all while making us laugh.

Ranging from the raucous to the romantic, the heartfelt to the harrowing, this highly entertaining and universally appealing collection is the literary equivalent of a night out with your best friends – an unforgettable and fun adventure that you wish could last forever. Whether she’s experiencing lust-at-first-sight while in the airport security line, sharing her own views on love and marriage, admitting to being an introvert, or discovering her cross-fit instructor’s secret bad habit, Amy Schumer proves to be a bighearted, brave, and thoughtful storyteller that will leave you nodding your head in recognition, laughing out loud, and sobbing uncontrollably – but only because it’s over.


This is one of the many eBooks I was recently given.  I’ve popped it onto my Kindle, ready for when I’m done with The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend.  I have heard mixed reviews about it but from the first page (and first lines) it sounds quite funny, so I’m willing to give it a shot.

What are you reading at the moment?

Check out the First Lines Fridays archive for more posts like this!

Emma

Follow me on: Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Facebook

March 3, 2017
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First Lines Friday: 17th February

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?  If you want to make your own post, feel free to use or edit the banner above, and follow the rules below:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first
  • Finally… reveal the book!

If you’re using Twitter, don’t forget to use #FirstLinesFridays!

It had certainly been a wild end to the autumn.  On the Heath a gale stripped the glorious blaze of colour from Kenwood to Parliament Hill in a matter of hours, leaving several old oaks and beeches dead.


Read on to find out which book this extract is from…

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The Loney by Andrew Michael Hurley

The Loney

INFO | Goodreads

BUY | The Book Depository


Summary:

Two brothers. One mute, the other his life long protector.

Year after year, their family visits the same sacred shrine on a desolate strip of coastline known as the Loney, in desparate hope of a cure.

In the long hours of waiting, the boys are left alone. They cannot resist the causeway revealed with every turn of the treacherous tide, the old house they glimpse at its end…

Many years on, Hanny is a grown man no longer in need of his brother’s care.

But then the child’s body is found.

And the Loney always gives up its secrets, in the end.


I don’t know how exactly, but I picked up this book thinking it would be just a piece of general fiction about two brothers and a mystery.  In fact, I can be quoted somewhere saying, “oh, I am hoping it will have similarities to The Shock of the Fall“.  Wrong.  This book is a horror story.  I’m so glad I found that out before I continued reading it at 11pm in bed.  As for the story itself, it is wonderfully descriptive, though it is a little slow waiting for the action to start – I’m 50 pages in and a whole lot of not-very-much has happened so far.  But this story won the 2015 Costa Book Awards, so I’m giving it the benefit of the doubt.

Read this book?  What are your thoughts on it?

Check out the First Lines Fridays archive for more posts like this!

Emma

Follow me on: Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Facebook

February 17, 2017
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First Lines Friday: 10th February

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?  If you want to make your own post, feel free to use or edit the banner above, and follow the rules below:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first
  • Finally… reveal the book!

If you’re using Twitter, don’t forget to use #FirstLinesFridays!

Inner North London
top-floor flat.
All white walls
white carpet
white cat.


Read on to find out which book this extract is from…

Arrow

Arrow

Arrow

Storm by Tim Minchin

22997383

INFO | Goodreads

BUY | The Book Depository


Summary:

A storm is brewing at a London Dinner party.  When Tim meets the mysterious fifth guest at the table, small talk descends into a battle between science and belief.


I have so much love for this book.  I am a huge fan of Tim Minchin, and was fortunate enough to see him perform in Cardiff in Jesus Christ Superstar a couple of years ago.  I enjoy his comedy too, and let’s face it, pretty much everything else he has dabbled in.  I even donated to MND Australia when I was moved to tears by his contribution to ‘The Fading Symphony’.  So I am biased, completely biased, but you really should read this book – it is witty and wonderfully written.  I’ll be reviewing it in the weeks following Gra-fix Novel Week, so watch this space.

Want more First Lines Fridays posts?  Check out the First Lines Fridays archive!

Emma

Follow me on: Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Facebook

February 10, 2017
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First Lines Friday: 13th January

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?  If you want to make your own post, feel free to use or edit the banner above, and follow the rules below:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first
  • Finally… reveal the book!

If you’re using Twitter, don’t forget to use #FirstLinesFridays!

Cape Sata is the end of Japan.

When you turn your back to the sea and look northward, all of mainland Japan is balanced, swordlike, above you.


Read on to find out which book this extract is from…

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Hokkaido Highway Blues by Will Ferguson

INFO | Goodreads

BUY | The Book Depository


Summary:

The book follows Will Ferguson as he hitchhikes 1,800 miles north through Japan following the Cherry Blossom Front (Sakura Zensen). The arrival of the blossom is a national event in Japan, eagerly tracked on television bulletins, and besides marking the end of winter and the start of the business cycle it facilitates a burst of heavy drinking disguised as a communal meditation on transience.

Surveying the country from the not quite private, not quite public, position of the passenger seat, Ferguson sees the Japan not written about in guide books, but gets to the heart of this intriguing and contradictory country. This is a laugh out loud, warm-hearted account with a generous helping of satire.


I was gifted this book for Christmas, and started it the other day.  It was recommended to me alongside For Fukui’s Sake by a friend with excellent reading taste, and despite having the smallest writing I’ve seen in years, it is so far a very enjoyable read!  Plus, it is giving me a real sense of wanderlust, and I’m desperate now to return to Japan again…

Want more First Lines Fridays posts?  Check out the First Lines Fridays archive!

Emma

Follow me on: Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Facebook

January 13, 2017
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First Lines Friday: 16th December

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?  If you want to make your own post, feel free to use or edit the banner above, and follow the rules below:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first
  • Finally… reveal the book!

Feel free to comment below or tag me in the post, so I can check it out and maybe share it on Twitter.

Tyler gets me a job as a waiter, after that Tyler’s pushing a gun in my mouth and saying, the first step to eternal life is you have to die.


Read on to find out which book this extract is from…

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Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk

825840

INFO | Goodreads

BUY | The Book Depository


Summary:

Every weekend, in basements and parking lots across the country, young men with good white-collar jobs and absent fathers take off their shoes and shirts and fight each other barehanded for as long as they have to.  Then they go back to those jobs with blackened eyes and loosened teeth and the sense that they can handle anything.  Fight Club is the invention of Tyler Durden, projectionist, waiter and dark, anarchic genius.  And it’s only the beginning of his plans for revenge on a world where cancer support groups have the corner on human warmth.


This book has been sitting on my shelf for way too long.  I recently signed up to Rock My TBR for next year, with the intention of doing some much needed TBR tackling.  This is one of those books that I’d love to read – it’s only short and I already know I’ll enjoy it.  It’ll be hard to read it without imagining the characters as they are in the film though!

Want more First Lines Fridays posts?  Check out the First Lines Fridays archive!

Emma

Follow me on: Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Facebook

December 16, 2016
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First Lines Friday: 9th December

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?  If you want to make your own post, feel free to use or edit the banner above, and follow the rules below:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first
  • Finally… reveal the book!

Feel free to comment below or tag me in the post, so I can check it out and maybe share it on Twitter.

It was a queer, sultry summer, the summer they electrocuted the Rosenbergs, and I didn’t know what I was doing in New York.


Read on to find out which book this extract is from…

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The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath

12478803

INFO | Goodreads

BUY | The Book Depository


Summary:

When Esther Greenwood wins an internship on a New York fashion magazine in 1953, she is elated, believing she will finally realise her dream to become a writer. But in between the cocktail parties and piles of manuscripts, Esther’s life begins to slide out of control. She finds herself spiralling into depression and eventually a suicide attempt, as she grapples with difficult relationships and a society which refuses to take women’s aspirations seriously.


Someone recently recommended The Bell Jar to me, so I thought it was about time I gave it a shot – it isn’t the longest book, and I need something completely different to help me recover from my Ready Player One book hangover.  I know from what I’ve heard of it that The Bell Jar is quite an intense read, dealing with mental illness and feminist issues – I look forward to reading it, and seeing how these topics are handled.

Want more First Lines Fridays posts?  Check out the First Lines Fridays archive!

Emma

Follow me on: Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Facebook

December 9, 2016
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First Lines Friday: 2nd December

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?  If you want to make your own post, feel free to use or edit the banner above, and follow the rules below:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first
  • Finally… reveal the book!

Feel free to comment below or tag me in the post, so I can check it out and maybe share it on Twitter.

Everyone my age remembers where they were and what they were doing when they first heard about the contest.


Read on to find out which book this extract is from…

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Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

12600138

INFO | Goodreads

BUY | The Book Depository


Summary:

In the year 2044, reality is an ugly place. The only time teenage Wade Watts really feels alive is when he’s jacked into the virtual utopia known as the  OASIS. Wade’s devoted his life to studying the puzzles hidden within this world’s digital confines, puzzles that are based on their creator’s obsession with the pop culture of decades past and that promise massive power and fortune to whoever can unlock them. When Wade stumbles upon the first clue, he finds himself beset by players willing to kill to take this ultimate prize. The race is on, and if Wade’s going to survive, he’ll have to win—and confront the real world he’s always been so desperate to escape.


Ready Player OneThis book is exactly the book I’ve been searching for to get me out of my reading slump.  It is exciting, original, and triggering geek-outs every few pages.  I’ve never read anything like it before!

I’m only a third of the way through, but I already think every geek should give it a read – it really is something special.  I can’t wait to review it!

Want more First Lines Fridays posts?  Check out the First Lines Fridays archive!

Emma

Follow me on: Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram

December 2, 2016
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