Book Club Review: Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card

Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card

Name: Ender’s Game

Author: Orson Scott Card

Genre: Young Adult, Science Fiction, Dystopian

“In the moment when I truly understand my enemy, understand him well enough to defeat him, then in that very moment I also love him. I think it’s impossible to really understand somebody, what they want, what they believe, and not love them the way they love themselves. And then, in that very moment when I love them…. I destroy them.”

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review

Ender’s Game was so different from the books I have been reading recently; I was excited but apprehensive about what it would be like. Thankfully, reading it was well worth the risk.

Ender’s Game follows Andrew Wiggin (known to most as Ender), as he is accepted into Battle School. With the fear of another attack from the aliens known as Buggers, the adults push Ender to the limit, to see if he has what it takes to command their fleet.

I was rooting for Ender from the start. I loved that he stood up for himself, that the fear of becoming like his awful brother Peter was shaping him into a kind, compassionate person. I liked the style of narrative – I enjoyed being able to see inside Ender’s head whilst objectively viewing his behaviour.

I thought it was a very clever book. Scott makes no attempt to hide that the adults are exploiting Ender in a truly immoral way, breaking him down piece by piece. Yet, that big twist at the end (I refuse to ruin it for potential readers) springs out of nowhere. Perhaps a more observant reader would have picked up on subtle clues, but I was completely beside myself when I found out. I just knew the consequences for Ender would be dire.  Funny how adults messing around with children’s heads results in the child growing into an unstable adult, and in this sense I could see parallels with We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves (review found here).  It really did sadden me.

One of the elements of the book I really enjoyed was the moral conflict, something that really affects Ender near the end of the book. I touch on this in my checkpoint post too. At what cost will the human race ensure their survival? I found it alarming that the humans wanted to literally wipe the Buggers out of existence. Fear makes people do horrendous things, but I was surprised at how vicious humans were portrayed to be – children and adults alike.

I also found the politics between the children to be very interesting, and another way the book is clever. It reminded me of Lord of the Flies – how hierarchies and groups formed among the children. Knowing Ender’s fear at the beginning of the book, I was so proud of him when he was promoted again and again, each time becoming stronger.

I could talk about this book all day as it has completely blown my mind, but this review has to end somewhere. Has anyone read any other books in the series?  I’d love to know what happens to Ender in the end.

Star rating: ★★★★★ (5/5)

Emma

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6 Comments

  • Reply August Round-Up | Wandering Words

    […] Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card (review here) […]

    September 30, 2015 at 3:12 pm
  • Reply Twelve Days of Bookmas (4/12) | Top 5 Recommendations from 2015 | Wandering Words

    […] I read Ender’s Game for August’s book club, and I can honestly say that it is the best piece of science fiction I have ever read.  I recommend to anyone with an interest in space and science fiction, or someone looking for a YA novel that doesn’t revolve around romance.  My review can be found here. […]

    December 28, 2015 at 8:19 am
  • Reply August Round-Up - Wandering Words

    […] Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card (review here) […]

    May 18, 2016 at 11:37 am
  • Reply One Year of Words and Geeks Book Club

    […] Enders Game, For me personally I think this has been my Favourite of the words and geeks book club books, It is a sci-fi that will change you perspective on things, Enders game kept me guessing all the way to the end, and the ending surprised me deeply. sometimes you get so absorbed into the story and the war games, that you forget that the characters are only children, and that is the scariest thing of all when you stop and really think about what the children are doing. there are more books in this series but I have never actually got around to reading those although I do want to buy them if they are as good as the book – also this is one of those cases where the film has not done the story justice and made me so frustrated while i was watching it  Although it appears as my final review never made it to the site because it was during this period last year that my Grandparents Passed away, so blogging was very disrupted and didn’t settle down for some time, so here are Emma’s thoughts on the book  Here  […]

    July 1, 2016 at 1:01 pm
  • Reply Celebrating One Year of Words & Geeks - Wandering Words

    […] favourites, but the ones that really stand out for me are Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card (review) and A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas (review).  Both books really grounded science […]

    July 24, 2016 at 8:44 pm
  • Reply Top 5 Book Recommendations from 2015 - Wandering Words

    […] I read Ender’s Game for August’s book club, and I can honestly say that it is the best piece of science fiction I have ever read.  I recommend to anyone with an interest in space and science fiction, or someone looking for a YA novel that doesn’t revolve around romance.  My review can be found here. […]

    July 26, 2016 at 6:58 pm
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